reviews of neither left nor right
"Spot on. Insightful, brilliantly researched and written, a book that anyone who loves this nation needs to read."
-former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft
"A book that all Americans worried about the fate of this nation should read before it is too late."
-Dennis Miller
"A must read for all who value freedom."
-Penny Nance, Concerned Women for America
reviews of neither left nor right
"Spot on. Insightful, brilliantly researched and written, a book that anyone who loves this nation needs to read."
-former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft
"A book that all Americans worried about the fate of this nation should read before it is too late."
-Dennis Miller
"A must read for all who value freedom."
-Penny Nance, Concerned Women for America

What is Functional Thinking?

Q. What is functional thinking?
A. Functional thinking is thinking according to the way nature functions.
Q. Who discovered functional thinking?
A. Functional thinking was discovered by Wilhelm Reich M.D.
Q. What is the importance of functional thinking?
A, Functional thinking provides a way to integrate all the natural sciences into a unified body of knowledge.
Q. What is the difference between functional thinking and ordinary thinking?
A. Ordinary thinking is either mechanistic or mystical.
Q. What is mechanistic thinking?
A. Mechanistic thinking is thinking about nature as if it were a machine.
Q. What is mystical thinking?
A. Mystical thinking is thinking as if there was a purpose to nature.
Q. What’s wrong with thinking mechanistically and mystically about nature?
A. Since nature does not operate like a machine and since it has no purpose, mechanistic/mystical thinking cannot provide a satisfactory understanding of how nature operates. Furthermore, erroneous mechanistic/mystical thinking often has destructive consequences.
Q. How does mechanistic/mystical thinking work?
A. When mechanistic thinking fails to provide a satisfactory understanding of nature, mystical thinking enters to provide a purpose to what is left to be understood.
Q. What is an example of mechanistic/mystical thinking?
A. An example is the statement: The heart pumps blood in order to bring oxygen to the tissues of The body. First, the heart is compared to a mechanical pump. Then, a purpose is given to explain why the heart pumps blood.
Q. What is the functional understanding of this example?
A. The function of biological pulsation defines the goal of bringing oxygen to the tissues.
Q. Where can I learn more about functional thinking?
A. The American College of Orgonomy gives a course on functional thinking to qualified students.

Understanding The Function of Terrorists and Terrorism

America is in a state of undeclared war with Islamo-fascist fanatics in the Middle East. The war is being waged on two fronts, militarily and ideologically. To understand the ideological war, it is necessary to have knowledge of socio-political characterology and of the emotional plague. Terrorists are Islamo-fascists belonging to the extreme right of the socio-political spectrum. The zealous fascist with his mystical reactionary belief system represents the ultimate in destructive rebelliousness. Terrorism is a manifestation of the emotional plague and it functions by paralyzing and immobilizing its victims through a frightening demeanor, terrifying threats and horrific acts of terror.
Those who are most terrified and likely to be terrorized are the liberal and other leftist characters in the Free World who, because of their pre-existing characterologically-based fear of forceful aggression, will use their rational powers to justify doing nothing and remaining helplessly immobilized at this critical time.
They are behaving in the exact same manner today as they did in England in the 1930s when Hitler was doing the same thing in Europe.

The Problem Of Recognizing The Emotional Plague

The emotional plague’s existence depends on its remaining hidden from everyone’s awareness.  But why is this so?  Why can’t people see this universal sickness of armored humans?  The difficulty that prevents this understanding lies primarily in the defensive ways of people’s thinking.

Comparing infectious medical diseases such as tuberculosis, polio or cholera to the infectious bio-social disease, the emotional plague, it is clear that in the case of the medical diseases the bacterial pathogen that causes the infection is not viewed morally as being “good” or “bad,” “right” or “wrong.”  Nor is there a moral concern whether the pathogen “meant” or “had the intention” to cause the illness.  These moralistic ideas about infectious disease were part and parcel of the thinking of past centuries.  If people looked at infectious diseases morally today, the sciences of bacteriology and virology would not exist, and  knowledge about infectious diseases would still be where it was 300 years ago.

But this is exactly where people are today when judging destructive human ideas and behavior.  They view them morally as being either right or wrong, the product either of a virtuous versus villainous individual or the result of a person’s good or bad intentions.  These ideas are examples of defensive, armored thinking and the moralistic attitudes behind the thinking of almost everyone including the political left and the right.

Because scientists looked at the function of the medical pathogens in its relation to the life of the host organism, whether or not they were destructive to it, these medical sciences thrived.  Regarding social problems, the questions that need to be asked are:  What is the effect or function on others of a person’s behavior or thought?  Are these consequences harmful to the core functions of  people’s lives?  Asking these  questions immediately brings the emotional plague as an infectious bio-social disease into sharper focus and takes the problem of the destructiveness of sick humans out of people’s moral ways of thinking and out of the strait jacket of politics.

A Prime Example Of The Emotional Plague: The War On Drugs

A sure sign that one is dealing with the emotional plague is that you’re damned if you do and you’re damned if you don’t.  How this relates to  the drug problem is that you are wrong if you legalize drugs and worse if you don’t.  In the past authoritarian era, children and adolescents were more likely than not to listen to authority figures.  Their rebelliousness was restrained by their muscular and character armor.  Because of the destruction of the authoritarian family, children and adolescents in today’s society are often likely to act out their rebelliousness in a subversive manner with no regard to the destructive consequences on their lives, convinced they “know it all.”  With no respected authority figure to listen to, they are in constant danger of becoming attracted to the drug culture.

Those in the drug culture, users and traffickers alike, are infected with an emotional disease, a socio-economically based medical condition that is in no way different from any other highly infectious and communicable disease.  The drug problem cannot be viewed simply as a war against an external enemy.  The tendency to use and profit from drugs, the “enemy,” resides and can erupt from within anyone, particularly young people.  They are at risk because of their strong tendency to be rebellious, their need to “fit in” and for financial gain. Therefore, their problems must be addressed non-judgementally from the perspective of the medical epidemiologist as an endemic, emotionally based medical disease of sick human beings.

The drug problem is as much a problem of the families of addicts and the social institutions that are dealing with it as it is of the users and the traffickers.  The first step in addressing the drug problem is to educate the public.  The reason that people use street drugs, including marijuana, is to help stop experiencing their painful emotions and feelings and/or to replace them with pleasurable (euphoric) ones.  Users must be treated with the knowledge that they are emotionally sick people that  must rely on drugs for relief.  Those who genuinely want help to face their painful feelings must be treated with this knowledge by skilled mental health professionals who are emotionally healthy themselves so that they do not fall into the trap of being judgmental.  The public must be able to think functionally, not moralistically.

Hardened drug traffickers are highly destructive sick people who profit criminally from the emotional sickness of other sick humans.  They must be sequestered in prison.  From a functional perspective, prisons exist to sequester individuals from society who are unable to contain the expression of their secondary destructive drives from within.  They therefore require external restraint (armor) in the form of incarceration.

Seeing the drug user as suffering from a medically based social illness not from a moral perspective as someone that requires to be punished, will help to remove its stigma.  This view places the magnitude of the drug problem in proper perspective.  It will be a long drawn out process of education and application of new knowledge on all social levels before this destructive manifestation of the emotional plague is reversed. (See “The War on Drugs: America’s Second Civil War” in my book, The Emotional Plague.)  

Social Science Versus Socio-politics

Most of what is written about in sociology is really  about socio-politics, not about genuine social science.  This is because there is little understanding of sociology from a solid biological basis and,  because of this, political solutions are often injected into sociology and mistakenly offered as solutions to social problems.

Today, the Left continues to peddle it’s outworn socialistic political solutions and the Right continues to oppose them.  The public is finally getting tired of this same old dialogue between the Left and the Right.  Many want real answers to why conditions are degenerating in every area of social life and what must be done so that they can be improved.

In The Emotional Plague and in my forthcoming book, Neither Left Nor Right, I show that the reason political solutions to social problems fail is because they originate not from the source of the problem but from the character structure of armored humans.  I explain that the different ideologies of the Left and the Right are, in fact, distorted ways of thought of people belonging on the Left and the Right of the socio-political spectrum.

In order to come to terms with social problems one must first adopt an entirely new way of thinking which is neither to the left nor the right.  This is called functional thinking: thinking the way nature functions.

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