reviews of neither left nor right
"Spot on. Insightful, brilliantly researched and written, a book that anyone who loves this nation needs to read."
-former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft
"A book that all Americans worried about the fate of this nation should read before it is too late."
-Dennis Miller
"A must read for all who value freedom."
-Penny Nance, Concerned Women for America
reviews of neither left nor right
"Spot on. Insightful, brilliantly researched and written, a book that anyone who loves this nation needs to read."
-former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft
"A book that all Americans worried about the fate of this nation should read before it is too late."
-Dennis Miller
"A must read for all who value freedom."
-Penny Nance, Concerned Women for America

Armor Interferes With Musical Expression

Before I became interested in medicine, I was a violinist trying to master the technical difficulties of the instrument. Despite having studied with the finest teacher there was something missing that had a powerful and negative effect on my playing.  This something was also present in other students I knew.  Then, when I came across Character Analysis by Wilhelm Reich, this missing factor became immediately clear.

Reich wrote: “It is from the plasmatic emotions of the chest that most emotional expressive movements of the arms and hands originate.  These lmbs are, biophysically speaking, extensions of the chest segment. In the artist who is capable of freely developing his longings, the emotion of the chest is directly extended into identical emotions and expressive movements of the arms and hands.  This is true for the violinist and pianist as well as the painter.”

I understood that in the presence of armor, emotional energy from the chest that enables reaching out (toward the world), particularly longing, cannot move freely into the arms and hands to find its musical expression. This was the missing something.  Although I had achieved technical correctness, I saw that as long as armor was present in my chest, technical expertise in and of itself would not allow full expression of the music’s emotion.

With these ideas in mind, I entered therapy with a medical orgonomist.  As armor (see glossary) was systematically removed in therapy, my playing improved dramatically and I became so impressed with the power of medical orgonomy that I lost interest in pursuing a musical career.  I decided to become a physician so that I could study and practice the science of medical orgonomy.

The cellist, Yo-Yo Ma is aware of the effect of muscular tension on the quality of his playing.  In a July 29, 2010  interview in The Wall Street Journal he said: “With every year of playing, you want to relax one more muscle.  Why? Because the more tense you are, the less you can hear.  So the more you can collect that energy and be unblocked and be totally present, the more you can say, ‘I’m here because I really want to be: there’s no other place I’d rather be’ and if you really mean it that’s not bad.”

Without recognizing the existence of muscular armor, Mr. Ma is also well aware of the  destructive effects of muscle tension on musical expression.

1 Comment(s)

  1. During my adolescence, my chest was the center of an emotional battle, to the point of creating a cardiiac biopathy. After many years of medical orgone therapy, finally one year ago I had an EKG, and my heart block was gone. What disturbs me most is that Reich discovered armor many years ago, and still orgonomists have to battle to be accepted. Thank you Dr. Konia, you and all the other medical orgonomists.


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